Northwest College

Annual Report

2016-17

Environment

Institutional Priority: Environment
Strategic Priority

Innovation and distinction in ENVIRONMENT


  • CUTTING BUDGETS FOR THE NEW REALITY
    Responding to revenue decreases from depressed energy prices, NWC cut approximately $2.8 million (15%) from its 2016-17 budget following legislative-directed reductions and revenue loss from Park County's mill levy. Board of Trustees action to implement the Reduction in Force policy, initiate a one-time special early retirement offering and discontinue three instructional programs resulted in both personnel and non-personnel cutbacks this year. Those decisions, coupled with not filling several positions from resignations or retirements earlier in the year, meant the loss of about 20 employees and reduction of administrative operations.
    The terminated programs–Farrier Business Management, Journalism and Film/Radio/TV–impacted a total of 13 students, all of whom were allowed to enroll in courses to complete their degree last fall. All scholarships, including those for returning students in affected programs and those for students who had planned to enter the programs, were honored.
  • PLANNING FOR FUTURE CONSTRUCTION
    Initial planning for two campus renovation projects is underway. As part of the state's level-one capital construction planning process, public meetings gathered input on the two projects–a visual and performing arts center and a student center. MOA Architecture of Casper and Plan One/Architects of Cody were selected to create architectural plans for the two projects, respectively.
  • AUDITING TO A POSITIVE OUTCOME
    An independent financial audit and federal compliance audit identified no findings, which was consistent with prior audits.
  • SAVING MONEY AND IMPROVING SERVICE
    Virtual hardware being installed throughout campus allows users more access to their software, desktops and files from unlimited devices and locations. For example, labs with specific software can be taught in any campus location, and students can access the software at 3 a.m. in their residence hall or apartment. By not purchasing individual computers for each user, NWC is expected to save $50,000-150,000 per year.
  • COMPLETING MULTI-SPORT COURT
    New outdoor recreational facilities for tennis, basketball, volleyball and space for dances are available to students following completion of a multi-sport court on the north edge of campus. Longtime tennis courts west of the DeWitt Student Center were removed in 2014 to make room for the college's Yellowstone Building.
  • OPENING MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES LAB
    A new Molecular Techniques Lab provides space and equipment for students whose work is funded through INBRE (IDeA Network for Biomedical Research Excellence), a National Institute for Health program. The University of Wyoming's INBRE program has provided approximately $35,000 per year to support science, technology, engineering and mathematics education at NWC. Grants as well as private donations through the NWC Foundation have also provided support. Research by NWC INBRE students has included searching for novel antibiotics in bacteria and fungi, assessing water quality parameters and monitoring avian disease.
  • WELCOMING VETERANS
    A new Veterans Lounge provides an environment for students with military backgrounds to come together to build connections with each other and with the college. The lounge includes a conference table, recliners, TVs, computers, mini-refrigerator and microwave. Military badging and flags are part of the lounge's decor.
Institutional Priority: Environment photo 1
Institutional Priority: Environment photo 2